Social Media for Speakers

The Urgency of Engagment

Although not everyone understands that engagement is an absolute necessity in any social media marketing efforts, I’d say the vast majority of people are either on the bandwagon or they’re at least starting to climb on it. Why, you ask? Excellent question. The answer is simple, really. If you don’t engage – then there’s no social aspect to your social media. At that point, it’s just media… In which case, it would probably be more effective for you to paint your face on one of those bus benches and pray for clients.

People no longer buy from you simply because you tell them to. They buy from you because they’ve built a relationship with you. What’s most important in ANY relationship is trust. That’s what you’re focused on building with your existing and your potential client base.

Now comes urgency. Let’s say you pose a question on Facebook to promote engagement. People start answering that question – or – they start asking questions back. You let the post sit…. and sit… and sit… ya know. Until you finally get the time to answer those questions or comment on those responses. NO! As [Robert Caruso], CEO of [Bundlepost] has said on many occasions in our phone calls, social media is REAL TIME. You need to be engaging your following consistently and actively. Your lag time should be no longer than an hour. Much quicker if at all possible.

The screen shot posted here is used with permission from one of my high school classmates. She very recently returned from a trip to Mexico and had an awful time trying to make it back home to her two kids. This was her tweet – which she then screen captured and posted on Facebook. While it didn’t make her experience any better, per se, US Airways did respond to her rather promptly – asking her if they had deplaned yet. If nothing else, that response let her know that they cared that she was on a return trip from hell and that they were addressing it. Reassurance does wonders for your customers.

So you can’t respond and/or engage while you’re in the back cooking, working on payroll, handling employee discipline problems, dealing with the state tax issues that have been haunting you for the last 2 months? Understandable – but as with anything else, understanding where you are weak and where someone else is strong is absolutely imperative in making a successful business. If you don’t have the time, hire someone. Hire someone who knows what they’re doing – AND has the time.

If you think you don’t have the budget to stay on top of your social media – look at where you’re spending your marketing dollars now. If you’ve done any research at all on marketing today, you’ll know that this is where you’re going to get the most bang for your buck. So you either find ways to trim in other marketing efforts to make room for Social Media Marketing or you absolutely MUST find a way to make time in your day to respond and engage.

Public Speaking and SMM – Easier than Pie.

Photo Credit: @posherov (Twitter)
Speaker: @SimpleADHDExpert (Twitter)

In addition to my strictly marketing clients – I represent speakers. I have for years. I do their marketing, booking – the whole sha-bang. Call me an agent, manager, bitch… whatever you want ;-)  It’s actually how I became so invested in marketing and saw it turn into what it is now – digital marketing.  Having been a part of this industry for 13 years now – I’ve seen some drastic changes.  So, to all of my artists, speakers, authors, etc… This one’s for you.

As a speaker/artist – if you aren’t flying solo (doing your own event), you’re likely a part of something bigger. You’re doing a keynote or a break-out session for a larger conference, right? So are you following that group on Twitter? No?? Facebook?  NOO??? Why not – that’s gold. You have access to an entire organization’s audience. This is the perfect opportunity for you to connect with the organization. Find out what’s important to them and incorporate it into your presentation. Nothing makes a better impression than being on your A game and caring about what’s important to your client.  Re-tweet information from your upcoming clients. Mention their conference in your own tweets – but don’t forget to tag your clients. That (likely) means you’ll get re-tweeted by them – which means you’re getting seen by their entire following.

Here’s the one that many of you probably haven’t considered:  Socially – it’s been unacceptable for years for people to play on their phones while someone is up speaking.  Before you get up and start speaking on your topic, address that very fact. Take 2-3 minutes. Something like, “Ok, I know all of you are probably going to feel some kind of way about this, but… if you have a smart phone or tablet – take it out. Go ahead….. Now, go to whatever twitter app you use and follow me.” Make sure to use a projector of some sort that have your Twitter handle so it’s visible to everyone.  Here’s the other thing – you may have read about hashtag campaigns. If you haven’t – [Click Here] – to read my blog about them. If you’re a speaker who speaks about overcoming fears – maybe your hashtag would be #FearThis.  So if it were me speaking about fear, I would have this on a projector:

Follow me: Twitter – @amberkpowers
Use Hashtag:  #FearThis

Encourage your audience to tweet throughout your presentation using that hashtag. If they find a statement funny, they should quote it with that hashtag. If they like a quote you used, quote it with that hashtag. Teach your audience to market you properly. It just takes minutes.When people start to see that hashtag enough, they’re going to click on it and be linked back to you. Viola, hello future clients.

Your social media campaign doesn’t end there. Etiquette is still insanely important, be it virtual or not. Anyone who uses your hashtag and tags you in a post gets followed back. Grant it – it won’t be real time, but when you get back to the hotel or back home, it should be the first thing you do. Well, then first thing you do after you invade the mini-bar.

Also – in terms of etiquette – be informed about the conference where you’re speaking. If they have a hashtag campaign already, encourage people to use that as well. You can use multiple hashtags in one post – it’s just important to use them in moderation.

You are, indeed, your biggest voice – so use it. It just so happens that your megaphone is now digital, which works to your advantage since your reach is nearly infinite. You have a new tool in your tool belt. One that can bring you substantially more money if you use it properly. Why not?

CLICK HERE IF YOU’RE A SPEAKER SEEKING REPRESENTATION/MANAGEMENT

How to Annoy Fans and Lose Followers

As you can imagine, I spend A LOT of time online. The internet is a vast universe and I enjoy studying companies, large and small, to see what they are doing with their social media. How active are they? How consistent? Are they posting content that is relevant to their audience? Is it not just relevant – but quality? It’s not hard to see when content is merely slapped on a social media outlet just to say it’s been done.

Consumers these days are smarter than ever. They expect quality and anything less than that is going to alienate them. They also don’t want to be bombarded with the same boring message.

In the words of Jay Baer, from his book YOUtility (used with permission)

Top-of-mind awareness requires companies to send messages consistently, but today’s consumers are besieged with every company of every type, size, and description jostling for attention, making pleas to friend, follow, subscribe, read, watch and click. Unimaginative marketers attempt to stand out with message frequency, or by exchanging bribes for attention (resulting in an explosion of Facebook contests and giveaways, among other tactics.)

But sending messages too often can have unintended consequences. Exact Target’s 2012 United Kingdom version of “The Social Breakup” study found that the most often cited reason consumers “unlike” a company on Facebook is that they felt “bombarded by messages.” And, as noted by Jeff Rohrs, Exact Target’s vice president of Marketing Research and Education, all consumers “have to do is just ignore the messages over a period of time, and they slowly get suppressed by Facebook. You simply won’t show up anymore, even if your brand is technically “liked.”

And there it is, my friends in small business. While your intentions, I’m certain, were to build your following and build relationships – one of my life mottos is “All things in moderation.” There are some social media professionals that will tell you there are specific times to post – be it to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or any other platform. They’ll also tell you there’s a magic number as to how many times you post in a day. I personally think that’s a bit bogus. It’s not about how MUCH you post anymore. It’s about how CONSISTENT you are.

Sure, analytics can tell us when the majority of our audience is online – however – you need to keep your eyes open. Watch what you post. Pay attention to the content, the reaction of your followers, amount of engagement. Idle posts get you nowhere. Once people start seeing others talking – they’re going to want to be heard as well – and YOU need to listen. No computer can replace human contact, interaction… relationship building. This is all dependent upon you, someone who knows you and your business or someone you trust can learn it.

Moral of the story – Is marketing via social media a science?  Of sorts – but the truth is that there isn’t a cookie cutter approach to it. Each business is different as its audience is different from one to another. Audience = people. As we each are different, our businesses must cater to that uniqueness. This is the joy of relationship building, therefore, the joy of social media.

Why, Social Media, Why?

From the Forward of “YOUtility Why Smart Marketing is about Help Not Hype” by [Jay Baer] of [Convince and Convert] (with permission)

I was officially scared to death. It was November 2008. The stock market was in a terrible nose dive. Presidential candidates John McCain and Barack Obama debated what should be done about failing banks and financial institutions. To say the U.S. economy was in a tailspin would be an understatement, and consumer confidence was suddenly, almost overnight, shaken to the core.

Within days of the market collapse I had four customers withdraw their deposits. More would follow in the coming weeks. What had appeared to be a healthy late spring and winter for my business was becoming a nightmare.

I was a “pool guy,” as homeowners often call us. Along with my two business partners I had owned River Pools and Spas in Warsaw, Virginia, since 2001. We started with a beat-up pickup truck, three guys, and a dream. By 2008 we had become a formidable in-ground swimming pool construction company with more than seventy fiberglass pool installations a year in Virginia and Maryland.

Going into 2008 I was oozing with confidence. Our brand was expanding, and we were pushing growth as hard as we possibly could. Finally, after years of physical, mental, and emotional sacrifice we were going to experience the fruits of our labors. But no amount of sacrifice or experience could have prepared us for the economic collapse. The faucet that had been flowing wide open during the previous decade suddenly refused to allow even a drop to fall.

By January 2009, our company was on the brink of complete financial ruin. The phone simply wasn’t ringing. It stood to reason; one thing consumers rarely do in the worst economic times since the 1930s is sit around the dinner table and decide to purchase a swimming pool. Even in the rare circumstances when there were interested customers, banks had made luxury-lending nearly impossible with the tightening of credit and the evaporation of home equity due to the collapse of the real estate market. We had almost no projects for the foreseeable future. Our credit lines were maxed out, our sixteen employees were sitting at home with nothing to do, and our bank accounts were overdrawn for three consecutive weeks.

I was depressed, scared and out of ideas. I found myself turning to the one place we seem to go to find the answers we’re looking for – the Internet. Since I certainly wasn’t installing pools, I had plenty of time to research new marketing and business concepts; as I did, concepts like “blogging,” “inbound marketing,” content marketing,” and “social media” kept coming up again and again.

Like most of us I had an inherent sense that business and marketing were shifting to the web, but, as a not particularly computer-savvy guy, it wasn’t something that had ever seemed applicable to my business. But, I’d never been more ready to try something new. Unless we figured out a way to generate more leads and sales without spending money on advertising, we were going to close our doors, and my business partners and I would lose our homes.

It was time to sink or swim.

What I discovered first, and what will become exceptionally clear in this book, is that consumers of all types expect to find answers on the Internet now, and companies that can best provide that information garner trust and sales and loyalty. Success flows to organizations that inform, not organizations that promote. It’s a fundamental change in how I think about business, and you’ll think differently too, after reading Youtility.

So this one’s going out to all you small business owners out there. You’re my people. You’re the ones that have everything to lose by remaining stagnant. You might have thoughts similar to those of Jay’s at the time… feeling technically inept. There is more than a sufficient supply of contractors out there who can teach you. If you fear you’re just not teachable when it comes to technology – maybe you’re right. In that case, find a contractor to take care of your efforts for you. I’ve said multiple times on this blog that you absolutely must know what your strengths and weaknesses are. If you don’t – chances are you’re wasting YOUR time and energy (which equals cash by the way… YOUR cash) that could be focused where you excel.

I have two clients that are older gentlemen. One in his mid-sixties – the other in his mid-seventies. The gentleman in his mid-sixties is like a bag full of ADD mixed with good intentions. He is insanely good at what he does – working with animals. He is insanely bad at anything technically related. Instead of trying to figure it all out, he hired me. He gets to spend his time doing what he loves, I get to take care of what he doesn’t excel at. Likewise with the 75 year old. While he can’t afford to have someone take over his entire social media presence (which I can appreciate), he can pay me to meet with him once a month to fine tune his SM strategy, and while he has to take care of all logistics himself, we take out all the guess work of what needs to be done, when and how, with setting monthly goals and creating a plan for him to follow. This works great!

My rule of thumb is this: If I have to sell  you on the fact that as a business, you NEED a Social Media presence (and a strong one at that) – I likely won’t take you on as a client. Why? ‘Cuz ain’t nobody got time for that! ;) My time needs to be focused on coming up with content for my current clients, not spent on trying to reassure you (after two days) that SM is a valid and vital form of marketing. One of my friends says this in regards to finding clients: “If you get a potential client that wants to see immediate results….. RUN. They need to understand that Social Media Marketing is not a sprint. It’s a marathon.” Oh how right she is. This beast is all about building relationships. I don’t know about you, but if there is a man who is interested in me – if he tries to go from 0-60 in 3.2 seconds, he’s going to scare me off. Why? Because as a (somewhat) rational human being – I understand that solid relationships take time to build if they’re going to be sustainable. Friendships are the same way. If I just met you and all of a sudden you want to spend every waking moment together – it’s quite likely that this is going to be a turn-n-burn friendship – which I quite honestly have no time for. Social media is the same way. Take the time you need to build rapport with your audience. Make it your job to care about what they care about. Be genuine.

What I DO have time for is what Jay talks about a bit later in his book – spending time on MY content. Coming up with content that makes me an expert in my field so that I’ll be the resource everyone wants to come to. My number one client is me. It has to be. Why? Because if I’m not consistently staying up on what’s happening in social media – my clients suffer. If you take time to blink in this field, you’re behind your game. If you’re looking for a Social Media professional – I’ll leave you with this – make sure you ask them this question: “What client do you spend the most time on?” You might be surprised at the answer you get.

Until next time – where I’ll be reviewing more of YOUtility – You can get your own copy of the NY Times Bestseller ——>HERE<——-

You May Need to Tweak Your Twitter

My friend and I were discussing new followers we had on Twitter this morning. She and I both use Twitter for business, as do many others. One statistic I found said that as many as [85% of B2B marketers use Twitter.] Suffice to say, business people are certainly using this micro-blog for more than entertainment. In fact, I would venture to guess that 90% of my tweets are business related. Do I sprinkle bits and pieces of who I am – my character – my personality – in there? Absolutely. As I should… And so should you.

Here’s my point. You want others to at least THINK you know what you’re talking about. You want to provide valuable content, keep them intrigued and from time to time a little entertainment isn’t such a bad thing. When people click on your profile on Twitter, what do they see? This morning when I was discussing profiles with my friend, she stumbled on one profile that literally made her laugh out loud – followed by, “and WHY would I follow this guy back?” I can’t remember exactly what his profile synopsis said, but it was about 4-words long and may as well have said, “I like chocolate milk.”

Your social image is a huge part of your overall image. Your twitter profile should contain… well… a micro-blog of you. If you use your Twitter account primarily for your CPA business, that’s what the majority of your Twitter profile should be as well.  While “I like chocolate milk” may be funny as a Twitter profile for [Zach Galifianakis], he has established himself as a comedian. It fits who he is.

Here is my Twitter profile – just to give you an example.

President, Powers Digital Marketing / Social Media Professional / Entrepreneur / Supporter of Small, Local Business / Coffee Queen / Lover of all things bacon

Indianapolis · amberkpowers.com

It sums up what I do and who I enjoy working with with just a peppering of who I am outside of work – or things I enjoy.  If you use your Twitter account for business, make sure when people look at your profile, they leave knowing they could have an intelligent conversation with you about the industry you work in. More importantly, since it’s a social site – make sure you give them reason to follow you.

What Does The Fox Say? YouTube and Your Business

I’ve heard the question asked over and over again.  Why would I want to use YouTube as a channel to market my business?  I’m going to take the unconventional approach here.  I might get my throat figuratively slit by a few social media gurus when I say this.  You don’t necessarily have to.  Now wait.  I didn’t say you SHOULDN’T.  I said you don’t necessarily have to.

Lemme ‘splain myself.  If you’re a social media professional and your target clients are tech based, gamers, musicians, artists, etc… Then yes.  You should absolutely have a YouTube channel and you should actively use it to market your business.  Maybe you should consider that – even before you should consider blogging.

My target client is altogether different though.  My focus is on the mom and pops.  The small, home-grown, local businesses of Indianapolis and the surrounding towns/cities.  They don’t spend copious amounts of time browsing YouTube for Flula’s latest misunderstood colloquialism or Hannah Hart’s latest episode of My Drunk Kitchen – although they’re both two favorites of mine.  They’re busy making sure that stack of bills dwindles to zero, only to watch them stack back up tomorrow.  MY clients are on Facebook.  Why?  Let’s be honest:  They have little to no time to maintain relationships with people face to face.  Sometimes, this is all they’ve got.  Small business takes a TON of time to manage and run.

Now… ALL that being said:  If you do, indeed, find yourself with a little spare time on your hands, that time would be wisely spent on YouTube.  Here’s why.  What’s the #1 search engine in the world?  You betcha.  Google, baby.  So popular it’s now a verb.  “Google it.”  What’s #2?  Any guesses??  Most people don’t consider YouTube a search engine because of the content it displays – but it is.  YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine in the world.  Now I’m going to weave a tapestry of mind-blowing goodness.  Who owns YouTube?….. (It’s ok, I’ll wait for you to Google it.)…………. (hint, hint.)

Yep – GOOGLE owns YouTube.  So what does that mean?  Adding your videos from YouTube to your website (of course with proper tags, etc…) is perceived integrity in the eyes of Google. Perceived integrity then moves you up in the rankings of google (aka – SEO – Search Engine Optimization)  In other words, this gets you one step closer to being on the front page of Google when people search for your product or service.

Then of course – there’s the opportunity for your video to go viral. And let’s be honest. We all know what the fox says, right? :-/

What’s Your Poison?

Hi.  My name is Amber and I’m a prisoner to my schedule.  I’m also something of a social media addict.  I don’t know which came first: the job or the addiction to be quite frank.  Neither here nor there, truth be told.  There’s something I’ve noticed as a trend with social media pros.  Our job is also our entertainment.  While there are times that I definitely enjoy just breaking away, the reason social media has exploded the way it has is because we love being connected with others, right?

I don’t have a family, but I do know myself well enough to know that I’m a workaholic.  Workaholics often get their priorities all sorts of screwed up.  I wake up at around 7.  Immediately, I pick up my phone to check my morning schedule, see if I’ve missed texts, emails or social media messages from clients.  Return said calls, texts and emails.  Some days, I’ll then reach over, pick up my laptop and start working right there in bed before even getting up to brush my teeth and start my morning routine.

We live in a world obsessed with technology.  It feeds our never ending narcissism.  The more we get, the more we crave.  In the meantime though, what we’re doing is alienating the very people we’re trying to stay connected via a multitude of social media platforms.  We’re so sucked into our computers and phones that we fail to recognize the beauty of the person that’s sitting right in front of us.

I’ve found that what I have to do (as bad as I know it sounds) is schedule alone time.  I said at the beginning of all of this – I live by my schedule.  If I don’t set aside 30 minutes to step away and go for a walk, I’ll end up a vitamin D deprived mess.  If I don’t schedule time to spend in prayer or meditation, my spiritual walk goes straight down the toilet.  If I don’t schedule time to be with friends, I end up alienating them.

I know this isn’t much of a “how to” guide to making your social media more effective – but sometimes we have to take care of each other.  Give one another a gentle reminder that there’s more to life than the monitor we sit in front of 12-14 hours a day.  Hopefully I’ve given you a swift kick in the butt to push back that chair, open the front door – and appreciate the life we’re helping other people live.

The Marriage of PR and Marketing

I skimmed through an article today about the importance of making sure your social media team is also well versed in public relations.  My first thought was, “Well, crap. Someone else got to it before I did.”  It’s alright though.  It just lit the fire under my butt to write it myself.  Every person’s experience is different, right?  Right.

Names and company names will be changed (or eliminated) here to protect the…. less than innocent.

I offer my social media services in different ways.  I can be the person who hovers over your different social media platforms and pats you on the back when you do something great.  I will also tell you when you’re wrong.  But in this role – I’m pretty much hands off.  Merely a consultant.

Then there are the clients that I do everything for.  All of their marketing.  I look for trade shows that would be good for them.  I’m the voice at the end of their client’s line.  I do all of their social media, including engagement, etc…

Well – I do all of it until they decide they want to muck things up a bit. And here’s where the fun begins.  Social media is…. well… it’s social.  And so, it involves many things – one of which is emotion.  There’s something to be said for being transparent (some of the time.)  However, when being attacked by what seems to have been coined as “haters” – you HAVE to let that slide (to a certain extent.)  There’s a lot of ambiguity in the last two sentences so let me clarify by using an example.

One of my clients was recently targeted by a group of people.  They claimed his business practices were less than ethical.  Let me start by saying I wouldn’t work for such a client.  While he may not always be the brightest crayon in the box (hey, I keep it real) – he’s not morally or ethically inept.

So let’s call my client “Bob” – because that seems to be what I like to call my clients  (ADD moment:  All clients, male or female, from this point forward – will be called Bob. I like Office Space.  What can I say?)  Bob used to do business with another entity – a not-for-profit.  This group and he parted ways in one of the least amicable ways possible.  I knew things would blow up – and they did.  An anti-Bob Facebook page was started.  The anti-Bobs started harassing the Bob fans on his Facebook page.  Bob was called a thief, a liar, all sorts of nonsense.  It was a PR disaster.  It got so bad that it warranted being addressed, in a non-emotional, only the facts, ma’am sort of way, on his Facebook page.  And so, I did.  I gathered the facts and I wrote the letter.  I knew Bob was far too emotional to do so himself.  The letter was working exactly as it was supposed to.  It had a reach of over 15,000 people by the time it was all said and done. His following, at the time, was only around 4,500. About 95% of the comments that came as a result to that letter were positive, uplifting messages about how Bob helped them or someone they knew. Woo-hoo! Success!!

And then Bob’s family and marriage started coming under (written) attack from the anti-Bobs.  Keep in mind, this whole time, Bob was replying back to their hateful posts, then I’d call him and tell him to take them down.  Down they came.  Next day – same thing.  It was like babysitting a toddler for a week and a half of my life.  “Bob, ignore them.  They’re trying to get a response out of you and you keep feeding them exactly what they want.”  “Ok, Amber.  You’re right.”  Next day – any guesses?  Yes.  Same game.  I was one worn out shit storm stopper by the end of that week.

After a long conversation with Bob about what PR is and how his fans were viewing him because of his emotional outbursts toward the anti-Bobs – he chilled.  He got it.  Finally!

If I had been someone else, say just a Facebook poster… this story would have a much different ending. He’s called and thanked me more times than I can count – telling me that if it weren’t for me, he’d be out of business. Thirteen plus years in Marketing AND PR prepared me for what I handled.  If you’ve hired someone that can post on Facebook and Twitter and make it look nice, but doesn’t have any sort of background in marketing or PR, please… PLEASE…. for the love of….. well, Bob….. think about switching it up.  It’s not all about the posts.  It’s about being knowledgeable, implementation, engagement, staying one step ahead of the game – and if worst comes to worst – putting out fires.

Signed,

Fire Marshal Amber…. “Let me show ya something.”

#HashTagCampaign

^^Clever, no?  Haha – sometimes I amuse me.

I’ve covered it before, but I feel like I should again.  What is a hashtag and why should I use it?  Well, here’s the [definiton].  Why should you use them?  Well, a number of reasons, really. They can boost your [SEO], target your audience with better precision, make it easier for your potential clients to find your content… and the list goes on.  Use them – but do so wisely.  Whatever you do, please don’t hashtag every word in your post.  That’s going to land you a spot in [Hashtag Hell].

Now on to the title of this blog – a Hashtag Campaign.  You’ve seen them before and may not have even realized it.  On Twitter, specifically, hashtag campaigns have become one of the most effective marketing tools a company can use.  For Nike, however, their #MakeItCount campaign was used through Twitter, Instagram and Pintrest.  Their campaign started in 2012 and was so successful that it continued into 2013. After watching this video – maybe you’ll understand why.

So what are the rules for this hashtag campaign?  Make it easy to remember and most importantly – make it something that is intimately related to your business.  Maybe your business’ tagline?  Be creative, but wise when choosing.  If you’re doing product promotion or a short term promotion, make it something unique (that’s key), catchy – and something your audience will be excited to promote.

If you’re looking for further examples to help get those creative juices flowing – here are a hand full to help out.  [Hashtag Campaigns via Mashable.]  As always, collaborate with other great minds.  I have no doubt you’ll wind up on the road to #success <—- See what I did there?

The Never Elusive MLM

Pick a product.  Any product.

Perhaps you’d like to lose 20 pounds in the next 60 days. Well – post it on Facebook.  I dare you.  Within a day (depending on the size of your network), I’d guess you’ll have private messages trying to sell you the latest, greatest product. You’ll likely get messages from people selling [Advocare][Herbalife] or [ItWorks].

No?  Perhaps, instead, you’d prefer a handbag.  Or jewelry. You know they have MLMs (Multi – Level Marketing Companies) that sell [Jewelry in candles]?  They have MLMs for … I think… nearly everything.  In fact – you can [click here] to get to a list of the 7 most Hilarious Products sold through an MLM.  Apparently not even our galaxy is the limit, let alone the sky.

Am I here to say all MLMs are scams?  Heck no.  I’m not an MLM pro, but I am a professional marketer.  What I do know is what works and what doesn’t work in marketing.  I’ve seen three posts just today on people being fed up with spam from people who are involved in MLMs.  I, too, have been turned off from pushy, spammy people.  The truth is that the product that many of these people are quite literally pushing – is good!  If they’d do subtle marketing and let the product speak for itself, their results would show it!

Instead, often times what happens is this person… let’s call him Bob… sees a product from a friend.  He gets really excited about selling it because of the benefits he’s seen personally.  That excitement gets harnessed by Bob’s “up-line” and is used to fuel his way to the top.  That’s all great so far.  No rules broken.

Until now.  Bob has asked each of his family members three times each if they want to be a part of this business. No?  Friends? No?  That leaves Bob feeling like he’s going to fail so he starts coming up with what he sees as creative ways to reach people (aka spam.) *sad face*

Not only that, but he also starts bullying people into joining.  “I just got a check for $350 and you’re over there whining about how you can’t afford show choir for your daughter?”  Oh yes.  This stuff gets slathered on thick – and on social media.  Do people actually think this is effective?  Do they think this represents their product and/or their company in a positive light?  Cyber bullying sucks no matter what mask it wears.

The moral of the story is this:  If you are part of a MLM, your company likely has marketing guidelines,  it may even have hard and fast rules about what you can and can’t do on your own, including on social media…FOLLOW those guidelines.  Your company spent good money to hire marketing professionals that know what you should be doing – and likewise, what you shouldn’t be doing.  Listen to them if you want long term success.